Brooklyn Rowhouse with A Modern Update

Dynamic Architectural Publications

The ubiquitous rowhouse started popping up around the city in the late-18th and early-19th centuries as popular single-family dwellings. As the name implies, they were built with matching brick, then later brownstone, limestone, and terra-cotta façades, bringing architectural uniformity to city living. Today, as popular as ever, they still might look cohesive from the street, but once inside, owners have customized to their heart’s and wallet’s content in order to make city living that much more palatable. Entrepreneur Tim Cotton, and his wife, Anne-Laure Py, moved to Brooklyn in 2014 in search of a house that would accommodate their growing family. …

kinetic facades

Kinetic Façades: Tactile Machines for Living

Dynamic Architectural Publications

Seattle-based architectural firm Olson Kundig has recently crafted a number of unique off-grid, low-tech smart homes with transforming facades. Although seemingly unsophisticated, their façades utilize intricate systems of hinges, pulleys and bearings, devised by Phil Turner, the firm’s in-house “gizmologist.” These hand-operated elements bring tactile experience back to architecture, challenging people to rethink their relationship with the environment around them. The Bigwood Residence, located at the base of the Smoky Mountains in Idaho and built with materials and solutions provided by Dynamic Architectural are highlighted in these unique structures. “The outdoors is welcomed in at nearly every turn, with expansive …

Welded Aluminum Windows

Welded Metal Windows vs. Mechanically-Fastened: What’s the Comparison?

Dynamic Architectural Learning Center

A key feature of our Steel, Bronze or Alumin-Arte series of thermally broken metal windows and doors is that components are cut, welded, ground smooth, and then painted. This results in a different product than a mechanically-fastened system. Here’s a quick look at why we do welded metal windows, how we do it, and the results in terms of strength, aesthetics, and longevity. Mechanically-Fastened Metal Windows The standard method of assembling aluminum systems typically involves mechanically-fastened profiles, either nailed, screwed, or crimped together. It’s a quick and efficient way to manufacture, requiring fewer fabrication process steps. Finishing costs are much …

New England Farmhouse with Steel Windows

Steel Windows Help Redefine New England Farmhouse

Dynamic Architectural Publications

The following article feature two project collaborations by Architect Tom Kundig and Designer Rodman Primack, one in Hawaii and the other on Long Island. Dynamic was pleased to have the opportunity to supply the steel windows and doors for the beautiful Long Island project. It’s always rewarding when you get to work with both a great architect and contractor at the same time. When they came upon a piece of land in North Fork of Long Island with a 100-year-old house spectacularly sited atop a promontory jutting out into the water, they, with Kundig and Primack, immediately thought, This is it. …

Benefits-of-Thermally-Broken-Metal-Windows

Benefits of Thermally Broken Metal Windows

Dynamic Architectural Learning Center

The “Metal Movement” and “Thermally Broken.”. Why you want your metal windows to be BROKEN. Thermally broken metal windows provide several benefits over non-thermally broken systems. We are often asked about specific performance benefits. The basic performance premise is: Improved overall thermal performance over traditional non-thermally broken systems. Improved NFRC U-Values over non-thermally broken systems. The lower the u-value, the better the performance. Improved NFRC Condensation resistance factors (interior sweating/ice build-up). Narrow profiles equal or similar to traditional non-thermally broken. Easier Code Compliance than non-thermally broken systems. Sounds like a no-brainer, right? So how does it work? What “Thermally Broken” …

Thermally Broken Windows worth the cost?

Metal Windows: Are Thermally Broken Metal Windows Worth the Cost?

Dynamic Architectural Learning Center

Recently we were talking with a Contractor in Southern California and he told us about a home he’s in the final stages of building. He had used an aluminum window system which had a large proportion of the openings with non-thermally broken metal windows and doors. The purchase price was reasonable, so the order was placed. As code compliance was being re-worked for several elements of the building envelope, the Title 24 consultant pointed out that the low thermal performance value of the aluminum windows meant the rest of the envelope now had to be boosted to compensate. The additional …